Pelvic Physical Therapy is becoming more well-known due for more informed providers and social media. However,  the availability of trained and highly skilled Pelvic Physical Therapists treating MEN is still lacking in the US as well as in West Texas. Thankfully, Dr. Amanda is both passionate and extensively trained in treating men in relation to pelvic health. Listed below are common pelvic conditions that Amanda has experience in treating and are commonly treated with Pelvic Physical Therapy. 

Pelvic Physical Therapy

for Men

 
Urinary or Bladder Conditions
  • Difficulty urinating – can include hesitancy to start urination, start stop urination, straining to urinate, or other symptoms which often associated with pelvic muscle tension and/or impaired coordination of pelvic muscles

  • Incomplete Bladder Emptying – urinary retention due to obstruction or impaired bladder functioning

  • Interstitial Cystitis (aka Bladder Pain Syndrome or Painful Bladder Syndrome) – Persistent or recurrent chronic pelvic pain, pressure or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom

  • Nocturia – increased nighttime urination

  • Overactive Bladder – urinary urgency and frequency that can be associated with incontinence

  • Prostate Surgery – can often result in unwanted urinary side-effects (i.e. leakage) after surgery, removal, or other treatments (chemotherapy, radiation, etc.) 

  • Urinary Urgency – abnormally strong urge to urinate that can be associated with incontinence

  • Urinary Frequency – urinating more frequently than is considered normal (>10x/day)

  • Urinary Incontinence – involuntary urinary leakage (includes urge, stress, and mixed incontinence) either with a strong urge to urinate, during a cough/sneeze/jumping/exercise, or all of the above! Pee leakage after prostate surgery is common but DOES NOT have to be the norm! 

Bowel Conditions
 
  • Bowel Difficulties – poop problems such as sensation of incomplete emptying, straining for bowel movement, having to splint or push to have a bowel movement, poor bowel motility, and many more

  • Constipation – difficulty in emptying or reduced bowel movements

  • Dyssynergic Defecation or Paradoxical Contraction – (previously known as anismus)- improper coordination of pelvic floor during defecation

  • Fecal Incontinence – involuntary stool leakage. This can include smearing, full loss of bowel movement, or loss of poop when stools are loose. 

  • Incomplete Bowel Emptying – stool retention and sensation of unfinished or incomplete bowel movements

  • Pain prior to, during, or after BM – can be related to stool consistency, positioning, or pelvic muscle functioning during a bowel movement

 
Pelvic Pain Conditions
  • Abdominal or Groin Pain – pain experienced in any portion of the abdominal region or groin/inner thigh region

  • Anorectal Pain – pain experienced in any portion anus or rectum present in both males and females

  • Anodyspareunia - Painful anal intercourse

  • “Chronic Prostatitis” aka Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome –  male pelvic pain is classified as “chronic prostatitis” however the prostate isn’t always the main culprit. The two main clinical features of “prostatitis” are pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms however there can be a wide range of clinical presentations

  • Coccydynia – pain in the tailbone

  • Levator Ani Syndrome – pain or discomfort in the region of the rectum, sacrum, or tailbone which can be associated or aggravated by sitting

  • Painful Erections – often caused by increased tension, trigger points, or weakness in the anterior pelvic floor muscles

  • Pain with Sitting – often associated with coccyx positioning, pelvic muscle tension, or other musculoskeletal involvement 

  • Pain with or after Ejaculation – can often be related to musculoskeletal conditions of the back/pelvis due to tension, nerve irritation/compression, impaired coordination, and more!

  • Pelvic Pain – can present as genital, lower abdominal, gluteal, hip, or pelvic pain. Often other symptoms are present along with pain including urinary symptoms, bowel symptoms, or sexual dysfunction.

  • Penis Pain – when not due to an injury (and cleared by Urologist) often times  penis pain can be caused by abdominal or pelvic musculoskeletal involvement (tension, impaired coordination, etc). 

  • Post-vasectomy pain syndrome – pelvic pain that develops after vasectomy often involving increased tension (in response to normal post-surgical discomfort)

  • Pudendal Neuralgia – pain or discomfort in the pudendal nerve region (perineum, rectum, and/or penis)

  • Testicle Pain – when not due to an injury (and cleared by Urologist) often times testicular pain can be caused by abdominal or pelvic musculoskeletal involvement (tension, impaired coordination, etc). 

Sexual Dysfunction
 
  • Erectile Dysfunction – can be due to impaired tension, coordination, or strength of the anterior pelvic muscles. This can be common after prostate surgery but doesn't have to be the norm!

  • Hard Flaccid Syndrome – a condition where the penis is hard to touch, although not erect (hence Hard and Flaccid). This condition is commonly associated with chronic muscle tension and impaired blood flow/oxygenation

  • Premature Ejaculation – can be associated with impaired musculoskeletal functioning (tension, coordination, and strength) of the pelvic floor muscles

  • Pain with or after Ejaculation – can often be related to musculoskeletal conditions of the back/pelvis due to tension, nerve irritation/compression, impaired coordination, and more!

  • Peyronie's Disease – a connective tissue disorder that can cause penile deformities  and pain (curvature, narrowing, shortening, or bend) that increases with an erection

  • Sexual Dysfunction – difficulty during any portion of normal sexual activity (such as desire, arousal, or orgasm). This can include pain with intercourse or penetration (initial, deep, position dependent, or other), pain after orgasm, or inability to perform sexual acts due to discomfort. 

Prostate Disorders or Conditions
 
  • Enlarged Prostate aka  Benign Prostate Hyperplasia  an enlarged prostate (of non-cancerous origin) that can often cause urinary symptoms

  • “Chronic Prostatitis” aka Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome –  male pelvic pain is classified as “chronic prostatitis” however the prostate isn’t always the main culprit. The two main clinical features of “prostatitis” are pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms however there can be a wide range of clinical presentations

  • Prostate Cancer – depending on the treatment route chose (prostatectomy, TURP, chemo, radiation, etc.) can cause unwanted side-effects such as urinary leakage, erectile dysfunction, pain or other pelvic conditions commonly treated with pelvic physical therapy

Orthopedic or Pelvic Girdle Conditions
 
  • Abdominal or Groin Pain – pain experienced in any portion of the abdominal region or groin/inner thigh region

  • Coccydynia – pain in the tailbone

  • Diastasis Recti (Abdominal Separation) – separation between the two sides of the rectus abdominus muscle

  • Hip Pain – pain in the hip or pelvic girdle region associated with pregnancy-related changes of the body (laxity, postural, or myofascial contributions)

  • Pubic Symphysis Pain or Dysfunction – a condition that causes pain or discomfort at the pubic symphysis region often associated with excessive movement or instability

  • Sacroiliac Joint Pain or Dysfunction – pain or discomfort in the joint between the sacrum and ilium often times associated with hyper- or hypo- mobility and myofascial contributions

  • Low Back Pain – pain in the lower back region associated with pregnancy-related changes of the body (laxity, postural, or myofascial contributions)

  • Post-surgical pain/scarring – painful scar or fascia as a result of surgeries such abdominal surgery, hernia repair, and others

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