Disorders or pain in the pelvis and pelvic girdle can be embarrassing and socially isolating for women, men, and children of all ages. Pelvic Physical Therapy for women who are pregnant or post-partum is becoming more popular thanks to more informed medical providers and social media! However Pelvic physical therapy for women can address a wide variety of conditions and complaints---not just related to pregnancy!

 

Listed below are common conditions or complaints addressed in Pelvic Physical Therapy for women. The medical term is listed and the condition or complaint is described for clarity purposes. If you don't see your complaint listed but feel it could be addressed by Pelvic PT, please contact us for clarity!

Pelvic Physical Therapy

for Women

Pregnancy and Post-Partum Conditions
 
  • Diastasis Recti (Abdominal Separation) – separation between the two sides of the rectus abdominus muscle

  • Hip Pain – pain in the hip or pelvic girdle region associated with pregnancy-related changes of the body (laxity, postural, or myofascial contributions)

  • Pubic Symphysis Pain or Dysfunction – a condition that causes pain or discomfort at the pubic symphysis region often associated with excessive movement or instability

  • Sacroiliac Joint Pain or Dysfunction – pain or discomfort in the joint between the sacrum and ilium often times associated with hyper- or hypo- mobility and myofascial contributions

  • Low Back Pain – pain in the lower back region associated with pregnancy-related changes of the body (laxity, postural, or myofascial contributions)

  • Pelvic Organ Prolapse – occurs when a pelvic organ drops from its normal position and either pushes into the wall of the vagina or protrudes towards the exterior of the body (includes cystocele or bladder prolapse, rectocele or posterior vaginal wall prolapse, uterine prolapse, urethrocele or urethral prolapse, and rectal prolapse)

  • Perineal Tear or Episiotomy – painful scar as a result of tearing/surgical cut after birth of child

  • Post-surgical pain/scarring – painful scar or fascia as a result of surgeries such as C-section, abdominoplasty, prolapse surgery, hernia repair, and others

  • Sciatica – pain or discomfort associated with the sciatic nerve (spanning from lower back down towards the feet) often associated with pregnancy-related changes of the body

  • Urinary Incontinence – involuntary urinary leakage (includes urge, stress, and mixed incontinence) either with a strong urge to urinate, during a cough/sneeze/jumping/exercise, or all of the above! Urine leakage after having a baby is common but DOES NOT have to be the norm! 

Urinary or Bladder Conditions
 
  • Chronic UTI's – often associated with inability to empty bladder completely, pelvic muscle tension, or impaired coordination of pelvic muscles

  • Incomplete Bladder Emptying – urinary retention due to obstruction or impaired bladder functioning

  • Interstitial Cystitis (aka Bladder Pain Syndrome or Painful Bladder Syndrome) – Persistent or recurrent chronic pelvic pain, pressure or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom

  • Overactive Bladder – urinary urgency and frequency that can be associated with incontinence

  • Pelvic Organ Prolapse – (described above) includes cystocele or bladder prolapse, rectocele or posterior vaginal wall prolapse, uterine prolapse, urethrocele or urethral prolapse, and rectal prolapse

  • Urinary Urgency – abnormally strong urge to urinate that can be associated with incontinence

  • Urinary Frequency – urinating more frequently than is considered normal (>10x/day)

  • Urinary Incontinence – involuntary urinary leakage (includes urge, stress, and mixed incontinence) either with a strong urge to urinate, during a cough/sneeze/jumping/exercise, or all of the above! Urine leakage after having a baby is common but DOES NOT have to be the norm! 

Bowel Conditions
 
  • Bowel Difficulties – poop problems such as sensation of incomplete emptying, straining for bowel movement, having to splint or push to have a bowel movement, poor bowel motility, and many more

  • Constipation – difficulty in emptying or reduced bowel movements

  • Dyssynergic Defecation or Paradoxical Contraction – (previously known as anismus)- improper coordination of pelvic floor during defecation

  • Incomplete Bowel Emptying – stool retention and sensation of unfinished or incomplete bowel movements

  • Fecal Incontinence – involuntary stool leakage. This can include smearing, full loss of bowel movement, or loss of poop when stools are loose. 

Pelvic Pain Conditions
 
  • Abdominal or Groin Pain – pain experienced in any portion of the abdominal region or groin/inner thigh region

  • Anorectal Pain – pain experienced in any portion anus or rectum present in both males and females

  • Coccydynia – pain in the tailbone

  • Dyspareunia – painful and oftentimes difficult intercourse

  • Levator Ani Syndrome – pain or discomfort in the region of the rectum, sacrum, or tailbone which can be associated or aggravated by sitting

  • Pelvic or Genital Pain aka Myofascial Pelvic Pain – pain experienced in any portion of the pelvic region or genital region in both males and females

  • Pudendal Neuralgia – pain or discomfort in the pudendal nerve region (perineum, rectum, and/or clitoris/penis)

  • Vaginismus – spasms and contraction of the pelvic floor muscles present with entry or penetration of the vagina, often associated with pain

  • Vulvodynia – pain, burning, itching, or discomfort in the vulvar region (around the opening of the vagina) often with no identifiable cause

Sexual Dysfunction and Other Conditions
 
  • Diastasis Recti (Abdominal Separation) – separation between the two sides of the rectus abdominus muscle

  • Endometriosis – painful condition where normal endometrial tissue or lesions are found outside the uterus

  • Interstitial Cystitis (aka Bladder Pain Syndrome or Painful Bladder Syndrome) – Persistent or recurrent chronic pelvic pain, pressure or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom

  • Pain with Intercourse (aka Dyspareunia) – mentioned above and is defined as painful and oftentimes difficult intercourse

  • Pudendal Neuralgia – (mentioned above) pain or discomfort in the pudendal nerve region (perineum, rectum, and/or clitoris/penis)

  • Sexual Dysfunction – difficulty during any portion of normal sexual activity (such as desire, arousal, or orgasm). This can include pain with intercourse or penetration (initial, deep, position dependent, or other), pain after orgasm, or inability to perform sexual acts due to discomfort. 

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